A 320 stuck in mud YEG May 7, 2024

Aircraft Accident & Crash Investigation Topics
David MacRay
Posts: 776
Joined: Thu Jan 16, 2020 3:16 am

That turn looks pretty tight. They definitely cut inside the line painted, but it might have been nearly invisible due to rain.

https://aviationsourcenews.com/incident ... n-airport/


Nark
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Joined: Wed Jan 15, 2020 9:29 pm
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WTF was that captain thinking trying to make that turn?

Here’s a novel concept: ATC instructs you to make a turn that could lead to you putting her in 4-low, tell them no.

Another concept: slow down, set the parking brake and figure out what they’re trying to tell you.
I/we anticipate a lot however, we don’t always get what we expect.
Twin Beech restoration:
www.barelyaviated.com
David MacRay
Posts: 776
Joined: Thu Jan 16, 2020 3:16 am

Looks like they added some hardtop inside the corner in the other direction and it’s not nearly as tight.
Slick Goodlin
Posts: 846
Joined: Thu Jan 16, 2020 3:24 am

So did they miss the taxiway at first and try to salvage the turn, or cut waaaaaay inside the centreline here?
Image
Eric Janson
Posts: 73
Joined: Thu Jan 16, 2020 3:45 am

Looks like they were trying to make a120deg left turn.

In the photo the taxi appears to have been from the left of the photo to the right on the other taxiway - followed by the 120deg right turn attempt.

This isn't something that is trained - easy to mess it up if you don't know where your mains are located.

TIP:- You can always tell ATC "unable" - there is no rule that says you have to accept any clearance.
David MacRay
Posts: 776
Joined: Thu Jan 16, 2020 3:16 am

Again, I don’t know if the question mark shaped line drawn on the surface was visible at the time, but the nose wheel is inside of it. My rudimentary understanding is, that made it unlikely the mains would trail on the pavement.
Slick Goodlin
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Joined: Thu Jan 16, 2020 3:24 am

I wonder if United trains on basic references to estimate the main wheel track. I know my work pushes pretty hard to use the lower corners of the windscreen as a reference, and I suspect that’s probably a little conservative.

…but it will only work in a straight line.
Slick Goodlin
Posts: 846
Joined: Thu Jan 16, 2020 3:24 am

I’m pretty sure this is the intersection in question. It looks like there turn line isn’t super obvious even if it is visible and Jepp’s airport map doesn’t show that turn line at all.
058B6D80-0162-4125-86AB-32120BC8E592.png
It’s a pretty spicy corner to take if you’re going to try freeballing it in a jet.
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David MacRay
Posts: 776
Joined: Thu Jan 16, 2020 3:16 am

Yeah in my opinion they should add some concrete inside that corner there, particularly if the ground controllers are asking people to turn there.
Nark
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Slick Goodlin wrote:
Fri May 10, 2024 12:22 pm
I wonder if United trains on basic references to estimate the main wheel track. I know my work pushes pretty hard to use the lower corners of the windscreen as a reference, and I suspect that’s probably a little conservative.

…but it will only work in a straight line.
Ha, they don’t even teach how the priority of fuel pumps work.

The idea of Al Haynes or Sully being upfront is long gone. The FAA has fully embraced the “less is more” mantra.
I’ve been on the periphery of conversations where captains are discussing the dangers of deferred autothrust; and the need to refuse the aircraft (MEL).

Having gone through multiple “schools” of flight, Canada does a really great job requiring more technical and academic information on the macro level. The FAA gives you 100% of the answers to the test ahead of time. To pass any exam, you memorize the answer, not the material.
Twin Beech restoration:
www.barelyaviated.com
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