C-FBWH

Aircraft Accident & Crash Investigation Topics
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Colonel
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You’re in the news.

Piper Cherokee 6. Bought last summer. Based in Brampton.

I have $20 there was excess air in the gas tanks. I think the tower may have been closed and the runway lights were off.

ADS-B says it briefly exceeded mach in the descent. People shriek at me that it is never wrong.

https://www.flightaware.com/live/flight/CFBWH

Mon 05:41:55 PM 36.1389 -86.9172 ↙ 215° 132 2,300

FAA Identifier: JWN
Elevation: 501 ft.
Lights: WHEN ATCT CLSD ACTVT REIL RWY 02 & 20; PAPI RWY 02 & 20; MIRL RWY 02/20 - CTAF
CTAF: 119.45


Neil Peart didn’t need you to be his friend
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Scudrunner
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Canadians really like to smash up the Six's


The Six that crashed near Kananaskis Village
https://aviation-safety.net/wikibase/318489


To Quote the recording artist Loud Luxory

You want a ride in the Six
You want a dine in the Six (dine in the Six)
5 out of 2 Pilots are Dyslexic.
Squaretail
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Location: Group W Bench

Colonel wrote:
Wed Mar 06, 2024 2:59 pm


I have $20 there was excess air in the gas tanks. I think the tower may have been closed and the runway lights were off.
By the way it burned after the crash, I'd wager that he simply forgot to switch tanks. Or was of the practice of running one side dry before switching. Hadn't owned the airplane long, I'd wonder how long he even had a license. It was also a long day of flying for the fellow. I can't imagine it was made easier by shepparding his family around in a small plane.
The details of my life are quite inconsequential...
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Scudrunner
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Squaretail wrote:
Thu Mar 07, 2024 6:13 pm
It was also a long day of flying for the fellow. I can't imagine it was made easier by shepparding his family around in a small plane.
Definitely a factor. Hauling my family around in my plane I can be stressful. Having thousands of hours and probably a million bucks in training over the years not to mention recurrent and online training every year it can be stressful for a seasoned pilot.
5 out of 2 Pilots are Dyslexic.
trey kule
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About 15 years ago we were flying at night in what the South calls Vfr. ( Smog at night)
Into John tune, and we cancelled IFR as we needed to get in.

It was a challenge. More radio towers around there than quills on a porcupine , and they were high towers.
I can see someone having an issue turning back there at night particularly at his altitude. And if the visibility was not that good.

Hard to believe he would overfly an airport and then be out of fuel 5 mins later, but who knows. Looking at the video there was a fireball.
Does that aircraft have aux tanks? If IRC most pipers like that were left/right, but not both.
Was it injected?
Nark
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I flew the PA32 in Alaska for a year.

IO-540.

4 total tanks. 2 mains, 2 aux’s. Fuel selector in the floor center.

Lots and lots of towers around these parts.

One side burnt to a crisp and one not, leads me to think fuel starvation from one side only.


I was flirting with a girl on a flight , and personal SOP was to swap from main to aux at level off (that might be a POH thing, can’t remember) but I’d run the aux’s because they had 20 minutes of fuel or so…
Well I was running the aux’s running my mouth about how amazing I am, and forgot about that 20minutes… engine burbles, in the worst spot. I poop my pants, and switch tanks.


Didn’t get her number.
Twin Beech restoration:
www.barelyaviated.com
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Scudrunner
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Blancoliro as usual has some good breakdown of the crash


5 out of 2 Pilots are Dyslexic.
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Colonel
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Really sad. I glanced at the data for this airport, and I see it has an MSA of 3100 feet
and an ILS 20 for the runway that this guy lined up with.

It's really too bad he couldn't have dialed in the LOC freq, intercepted the LOC - looks
like he was pretty well on it anyways - and when the GS came down, kept the needles
in the donut until he hit the runway. He didn't even have to flare.

Over and over and over and over and over and over and over and over and over again,
I tell private pilots that when it gets bad, tell ATC to give you vectors to an ILS. Fly the
heading and altitude that ATC gives you. Dial in the LOC freq - ask ATC for it - intercept
the LOC, intercept the GS and needles into the donut until you hit the runway.

Private pilots have to have at least 5 hours hood for PPL and 10 hours good for night,
right? Been a few years, but what the fuck are the stupid fucking instructors doing for
all those hours? Partial panel on a stupid fucking steam gauge six pack?!

Learn to fly a heading and altitude under the hood. Learn to fly a zero/zero ILS. I know
I'm not as bright as a Canadian but that's what I taught.

Gosh, I'm not very bright. I know I know I know I know everyone loves loves loves their
GPS approaches, but even with vertical guidance, you don't have ILS lighting.

Get vectors to an ILS. Dial in the LOC freq. Needles in the donut, reduce power after
you impact the large runway. You will live and so will your pax. All ILS's are the same.
All of them take you to a very long, wide, well-lit runway. Great place to crash. All
you have to do, is dial in the LOC freq and fly the heading and altitude that ATC gives
you to intercept LOC/GS. Fly it by hand or push a button and have your AP do it.

If you can't learn that in 10 hours, take up golf.

Why is it ok for this guy to kill his kids? Why does everyone hate ILS's so much?
Neil Peart didn’t need you to be his friend
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Colonel
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Intercepting a LOC is like rolling an airplane. I can teach anyone to do it in 90 seconds.

ATC vectors you to the LOC with around a 30 degree intercept, though Canadian ATC thinks it's funny
to give you intercepts exceeding 90 degrees. Assuming you have a sane ATC .....

As the LOC needle starts to move, before it centers turn your heading to the inbound track from the
ILS plate. Look at your GPS. Slightly adjust your heading to make your track made good, the same
as the inbound track on the plate. You now have adjusted your heading for wind.

Your LOC needle will now stay motionless. Push on the rudder pedals to make corrections and
avoid overcontrolling. 2 degree changes will do it. Fly a PAR/GCA if you don't believe me.

Less than 90 seconds. But I'm just a dumbfuck.
Neil Peart didn’t need you to be his friend
Nark
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PAR is a dead art.

I did them in flight school.

It takes proficiency on the part of the controller, and not many left available.

The last one I did (non-military base) was 2015.

I’m not sure if I live in a glass house sometimes. But I was just bitching to my FO about a lot of other FO’s that don’t know what those things at their feet attached to the brake pedals are.
60* x-wind with a 15g25 knots. He did an ok job.

I took the family out to breakfast on Friday before work. Went to a field with cheap gas.
1 paved runway 3 grass. The wind was steady out of the east. I made the bad decision to land on the, direct headwind.
Our friend in the mighty 172 decided the paved 03 was better.
Okay, I’ll admit it’s really hard to practice x-wind if you don’t actually land with a x-wind.

But, eff me running. How can you practice x-wind landings if you land flat and drift off centerline. Obviously no rudder?


We need to lower the standards so everyone can meet them.
Twin Beech restoration:
www.barelyaviated.com
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